Wednesday, October 22, 2008

SOBs with shotguns

Some jackass shot a Mexican wolf pup in Arizona this month.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said the 6-month-old wolf apparently was shot to death while standing along a dirt road about seven miles southwest of Hannagan Meadow. The wolf was found dead Oct. 13.
Who does things like this? Why? And why doesn't someone else bust them, to the tune of $52K in reward money?

Not a great day for wolf news- Ralph Maughan has a post up about the bad year for reproductive success in the Yellowstone wolf populations. At least, though, that's due to natural attrition. Population fluxes are to be expected, right?

Someone send us some good news, OK? We're FREAKING OUT.

2 comments:

chrisH said...

To my knowledge, only one person has ever been prosecuted for killing a Mexican Wolf and that was in the first year or two of the reintroduction program.

That so many lobos have been shot and killed without anyone being caught reeks of conspiracy. It would be nice to see USF&WS do some aggressive investigation and not only find and prosecute the shooters, but all others even incidently involved. This is what the DEA does - a felony is a felony.

Anonymous said...

Chris H. is correct about the abysmal track record of law enforcement in nailing lobo poachers. By the way, I believe the shooting of an endangered Mexican wolf is a misdemeanor, not a felony. (Hi, Chris! It's your old NM friend. Good to see your comment.)

As for some "good news," there actually is a little, including the discovery of an uncollared, unnamed pack with pups on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR). This was reported at the Glenwood meeting on October 29th.

Also, after the poaching death of his mate in late June, Fox Mountain alpha male AM1038 managed, with a little help in the way of some strategically placed roadkill, to raise a couple of pups alone. Plans are afoot to translocate a female into his neighborhood, to promote a new pairing.

Still, it's extremely unlikely that we'll see more than six breeding pairs in the end of year count.